Home SOCIETY SENEGAL-FRANCE: Madi Seydi, an exceptional woman.

SENEGAL-FRANCE: Madi Seydi, an exceptional woman.

0
SHARE
Madi Seydi

Madi Seydi is a consultant in Communication and Political Strategy. Committed woman, woman of convictions and ambition, we present her inspiring career of militant woman, political woman and fighting woman as exceptional as her different actions. Focus on Madi Seydi, this French-Senegalese with a strong added value.

Against injustice
At the age of 14, during her first stay in Senegal, where her parents are from and where they decided to return, Madi Seydi discovers life, privileges, inequalities and injustices. Faced with this reality that she refuses to submit without a word, she decides to commit to give a little of it, help others and defend what seemed right to him.

His associative commitment
Its commitment is primarily associative with the main objective to help the weak and fight injustices, in short change the world. Great ambition for the 14-year-old girl she was, it was two years later that she joined the Senegalese Democratic Party (PDS) alongside Master Abdoulaye Wade who was at the time the number one opponent to the socialist regime and who will become President of the Republic of Senegal in 2000. Associations for the defense of women’s rights, the protection of talibés (students Koranic schools in Dakar who spend more time walking the streets to beg to study ), his commitment becomes political. Because for Madi Seydi, to make one’s voice heard, participate in debates, in decision-making, necessarily went through citizen engagement. She remains convinced that it was these years spent in Senegal where she discovered her African culture that ultimately she knew little, which gave her a sense of duty and commitment that led her to politics.

Studies of Public Law and International Relations
With a bachelor’s degree, she returned to Paris where she studied public law and international relations. During these 6 years spent at the University, she naturally chose to campaign for a better and more competitive university at European and international level. These are his first steps in student unionism. It is alongside UNI (the interuniversity right) that it engages. And to those who say they are surprised at her commitment to the right in terms of her African origins, she does not hesitate to remind them that her commitment is primarily linked to values ​​and a vision of society and not to a requirement. to conform to the stereotypes that would like to confine it to “the place” to which the collective conscience even the well-thought would have affiliated it. It is in this continuity that she takes her card to the UMP in 2005 after attending the Congress of Bourget, where the speech of Nicolas Sarkozy sounds at home as a personal call. This time, it is in Seine-Saint-Denis that she lays down her suitcases, her department of heart, the one where she grew up before going to live in Senegal. This department, despite its difficulties, its anchorage very left, it likes, for its history, its atypical identity but it is mainly because it likes the challenges that it chose to militate in Seine-Saint-Denis. She always says that politics is not made for children at heart, that’s probably what she likes. After holding local and then departmental responsibilities, in 2007, after the victory of Nicolas Sarkozy, she co-founded the National Youth Sarkozy Movement. It was born in Seine-Saint-Denis and eventually have local branches throughout the French territory. In 2008, she was elected to the National Youth Office of the UMP and appointed in the stride spokeswoman, a position she will occupy until August 2010. For two long and formidable years, she travels France to ensure pedagogy reforms carried out by the various Fillon governments.

At the origin of the creation of the blog “The Left Kill me”
In February 2011, she participated in the creation of the blog “The Left Me Killing”, which originally, wants to be a tool at the service of young people to enlighten them on the consequences of policies led by the French left. Today, those are 6000 visits a day, and they advance more towards the consecration of a media of opinion, which in this case would be the first right. In parallel with French politics, she is a member of the Senegalese Democratic Party and the Senegalese Liberal Party (during the split of the PDS), which have a representation in Paris.

A militant but also political course
Alongside her militant career, she traces her professional career in the political sphere. After various internships in institutions and international organizations in France, Senegal and Quebec, she started as a project manager at the Ministry of Education. Elected to the Promotion of Equal Opportunities, then she held the position of Parliamentary Attaché for 4 years in the Senate. Passionate about communication as a tool at the service of the political message, she decided to resume studies in 2012 to specialize in political communication. She then joined the Celsa (School of Advanced Studies in Information Sciences and Communication). She should soon support my dissertation.

Communication Consultant
Today, she is a consultant in strategy and political communication. While she walks with no insurance, she secretly dreams of being a French parliamentarian abroad or working in a major international institution in which she will bridge Africa, to which she is so attached, and France even Europe. In November 2013, she joined the Senegal Alternatives Africa Movement (SENNAF) as Deputy Secretary General, apolitical movement, bringing together Senegalese Diaspora anxious to participate actively in the development of Senegal and Africa.

An exceptional woman

Beside politi, she is of all the fights that could have known her generation to promote the place of women in society. In May 2011, she co-organized the 2nd edition of the “Women of Exception” meetings under the patronage of Mrs. Seynabou Ly M’Backé, then Minister of Women’s Entrepreneurship of Senegal. The aim of this initiative was to highlight the career path of women who chose entrepreneurship. Half of them were of African origin “An initiative highlighting African women’s paths, I had to be,” she says.

SHARE