Home POLITICS CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: Presidential elections: a tense socio-political context

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: Presidential elections: a tense socio-political context

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The date of the presidential and legislative elections in the Central African Republic was finally maintained despite the threat of armed groups a few days before. The Central African Republic was called to the polls on Sunday 27 December 2020 but the turnout was relatively low because many citizens did not dare to vote for fear of being attacked or abducted.Elections held in a tense socio-political context.

Nine days before the presidential and legislative elections in the Central African Republic, the armed groups had threatened to “march on Bangui”, the Central African capital, to prevent the holding of the elections. Supported by the Russian and Rwandan forces and the peacekeepers of the UN Peacekeeping Force, the government army was able to repel the attackers and thus allow the organization of elections from which outgoing President Faustin Archange Touadera leaves favorite.

Even if the National Election Authority (NSA) said it was satisfied with the overall organization of the vote, experts and observers are not of the same opinion. For them, rural or disadvantaged areas were not able to benefit from the same security system as in Bangui. 

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Moreover, far from the capital, constant fighting has been going on for nine days, and even on election day. That is why thousands of people were prevented from voting or deprived of their voter cards never arrived due to insecurity. For example, in the northwest, more than 500 km from Bangui, rebels seized election materials in Koui, threatened to kill election officials in Ngaoundaye, and anyone who goes to vote in Bocaranga, as in many other villages, according to local and UN officials who did not want to reveal their identity.

In Bossembélé, a city of 50,000 inhabitants 150 km from Bangui, more than 11,000 Central African citizens have not been able to receive their voter cards, according to a senior official of the sub-prefecture. These incidents lead observers to question the legitimacy of elected officials because a good number of citizens have not been able to enjoy their civil rights.

       

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